What is PMS?

What is PMS? What is PMS symptom? PMS meaning is premenstrual syndrome, which refers to a group of physical and emotional symptoms that occur in the days leading up to a woman’s menstrual period. Lets understand how can premenstrual syndrome affect a woman.

What is PMS?
What is PMS

Is Premenstrual Syndrome real?:

In the past, some people have considered PMS to be a “myth” because it was not always well understood or taken seriously. However, research has shown that PMS is a real condition with a variety of possible causes, including hormonal changes and chemical imbalances in the brain.

3 PMS and Mood Swing Myths:

  • Myth# 1 Everyone with PMS gets the same symptoms:
    PMS can look like the occasional chortle- good mood swing if you are lucky. However, you may witness anything from severe anxiety to violent emotional outbursts.

A picture of PMS has been painted in our culture to make it feel like all we need is a hot water bottle and a clinch, but in reality, PMS symptoms can be enough dark for some people.

Your premenstrual experience might include bloating, acne and constipation, while someone additional’s could be sore oversights, extreme sweet tooth jones, and diarrhea.

  • Myth# 2 You’ll crave chocolate
    You might witness food cravings or indeed obsessive eating along with PMS, and numerous people do thanks to changing hormone situations that result in us seeking out carbs and sweets.
  • Myth# 3 Your husband should steer clear of you:
    Ah yes, this bone remains the butt of numerous jokes; the myth that when you’re passing PMS, you must be hard to handle, hard to live with, and hard to make sense of. Thus the stylish course of action is to avoid you altogether. Accessible, perhaps. But not exactly practical if you live together.

If you’re like this woman who wants to disjoin her hubby once a month, the answer is nearly always. Talk about it. Track your symptoms. There are many tracking apps available now which helps to remember the dates of your periods.

These applications are so helpful in tracking your menstrual cycle along with the information regarding your fertility window and ovulation time.

Talk about your symptoms with your husband. How you feel at particular times of the month, and bandy them in advance with your husband, so you know to address any mood swings if they do arise.

It is important to note that not all women experience PMS and it can vary in severity and symptoms. If you have severe symptoms that disrupt your daily activities, it’s recommended to see a doctor or gynecologist to determine if there is an underlying condition and develop a treatment plan. Regenerate response

What is PMS symptoms?

PMS symptoms (Premenstrual symptoms) are a collection of physical and emotional symptoms that some women experience in the days leading up to their menstrual period.

PMS symptoms include cramping, bloating, breast tenderness, acne, fatigue, irritability, mood swings, and depression, anxiety, low mood, lack of libido, and emotional liability. These symptoms can vary in severity and duration for each woman.

Some women may experience only mild symptoms, while others may have severe symptoms that disrupt their daily activities.

PMS symptoms with PCOS:

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may experience similar symptoms as those with PMS, as both conditions can cause changes in hormone levels.

premenstrual syndrome symptoms
Premenstrual syndrome symptoms

Symptoms of PMS with PCOS can include irregular periods, heavy or prolonged bleeding, acne, weight gain, and hirsutism (excessive hair growth on the face, chest, and back). PCOS can also cause symptoms related to ovulation, such as pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen or pelvis.

It is important to note that not all women with PCOS will experience PMS-like symptoms and vice versa, and it’s also possible to have both conditions at the same time. It’s recommended to see a doctor or gynecologist as they can help diagnose and develop a treatment plan.

Pregnancy symptoms vs PMS symptoms?

PMS (Premenstrual Syndrome) and pregnancy symptoms can be similar in some cases

PMS symptoms vs pregnancy symptoms: Similar signs and symptoms of pregnancy and PMS include:

  • Headache
  • Enlarged, swollen, painful, or tender breasts
  • Weight gain
  • Back pain
  • Mood swings or changes like
  • Mild abdominal cramping
  • Fatigue
  • Mood changes or emotional symptoms, for example:
    • Crying spells / being emotional
    • Food cravings
    • Sleep disturbances or insomnia
    • Anxiety
    • Depression
    • Irritability
    • Anger

but there are also some key differences between PMS and pregnancy symptoms too.

Some common symptoms of PMS include

  • cramping,
  • bloating, breast tenderness
  • acne
  • fatigue
  • irritability
  • mood swings and
  • depression
    • These symptoms typically occur in the days leading up to a woman’s menstrual period.
    • Worst PMS symptoms includes severe cramps and pain, puffiness on face and swelling on body due to bloating, acne flare ups and migraine and insomina.

Pregnancy symptoms, on the other hand, can include

  • a missed period
  • fatigue
  • breast tenderness
  • morning sickness
  • frequent urination and
  • food cravings or aversions.
    • These symptoms can occur as early as the first few weeks of pregnancy and can last throughout the entire pregnancy.

It is important to note that some women may experience different symptoms or none at all. Sometimes PMS like symptoms are felt in case of pregnancy too. The only way to confirm pregnancy is through a pregnancy test (by dip stick test or BHCG levels in the blood) by visiting a healthcare professional.

Can stress increase PMS symptoms:

Stress can potentially exacerbate PMS symptoms in some women. It causes the body to produce more hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline, which can lead to an increase in symptoms such as cramping, bloating, breast tenderness, acne, fatigue, irritability, mood swings, and depression.

Stress interferes with sleep, which can make PMS symptoms worse. Additionally, stress can cause changes in appetite and weight, which can also exacerbate PMS symptoms.

It is also important to note that stress is a common symptom for many people, and some studies show that stress can also cause an irregular menstrual cycle which can cause confusion to recognize when the PMS symptoms occur.

Stress management techniques such as exercise, yoga, meditation, and therapy can help reduce stress and alleviate PMS symptoms. Additionally, talking to a healthcare professional about PMS and stress may also be beneficial.

Is it normal to get PMS a week before your period:

It is normal for some women to experience PMS (Premenstrual Syndrome) symptoms a week or so before their menstrual period. However, the timing and duration of PMS symptoms can vary from woman to woman.

Some women may experience symptoms only a few days before their period, while others may experience symptoms for several weeks , also can vary from one menstrual cycle to another.

The onset and duration of PMS symptoms are also influenced by various factors such as age, lifestyle, diet, and stress level.

What causes PMS?

The exact cause of PMS symptoms before period is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to the hormonal changes that occur during a woman’s menstrual cycle. During the menstrual cycle, levels of hormones such as estrogen and progesterone fluctuate, and these fluctuations can cause physical and emotional symptoms in some women.

Research suggests that changes in the levels of these hormones may affect the levels of neurotransmitters (chemical messengers in the brain) such as serotonin, which can affect mood and emotions.

Other factors that may contribute to the development of PMS include:

  • Genetics: some studies have suggested that a family history of PMS may increase the risk
  • Nutritional deficiencies: low levels of certain vitamins and minerals have been linked to PMS symptoms
  • Stress: Stress can exacerbate PMS symptoms
  • Medical condition: some medical conditions such as thyroid disorders or anemia can also cause symptoms similar to PMS.
    • Excess in salty foods, alcohol, or caffeine may make symptoms worse as well.

Supplements for PMS mood swings:

There are several supplements that have been studied for their potential to alleviate symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). However, it is important to note that more research is needed to confirm the effectiveness of these supplements, and it is always best to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen. Some commonly used supplements for PMS include:

  • Calcium:

Studies have shown that calcium supplements may help reduce symptoms such as cramps, bloating, and mood swings.

  • Vitamin B6:

Vitamin B6 may help reduce symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and irritability.

  • Magnesium:

Magnesium supplements helps to alleviate symptoms such as cramps, bloating, and headaches.

  • Vitamin E:

Vitamin E may help reduce breast tenderness and cramps.

  • Omega-3 fatty acids:

Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory effects and may help reduce symptoms such as cramps and mood swings.

  • Herbal supplements:

Some herbal supplements such as chasteberry, ginger, and evening primrose oil helps to alleviate symptoms of PMS.

Among the above mentioned supplements, MAGNESIUM is the magic supplement.

Magnesium and B6 for PMS:

  • Magnesium allows your brain to fire on all cylinders.
  • Magnesium for PMS lets you sleep deeper.
  • Magnesium eliminates your stress.
  • Magnesium makes your bones stronger.
  • Magnesium keeps your muscles healthy.
  • Magnesium reduces inflammation.
  • It is truly a MIRACLE mineral.

It’s also important to note that it’s not always safe to take some supplements during pregnancy or while breastfeeding, or if you have certain medical conditions or taking certain medications. Please consult with your healthcare provider before taking any supplement.

Research article on role of magnesium in premenstural syndrome.

Dosage of Magnesium for premenstural syndrome:

The recommended daily intake of magnesium for adult women is 310-320 mg/day. However, the recommended dosage for Magnesium supplements for PMS is not well established and may vary depending on the individual.

As per my clinical experience woman should take 320 – 500 mg/day during her pre-menstural phase, Once the the mesturation starts and symptoms settles down, take 310-320 mg/day on daily basis.Dosage of Magnesium for premenstural sybdrome

Best time to take Magnesium supplement:

Take magnesium supplement 1 hour after dinner, before sleeping.

Vitamin B6 for PMS:

Some studies have suggested that vitamin B6 may be effective in reducing symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), particularly those related to mood, such as depression, anxiety, and irritability.

The mechanism by which vitamin B6 may help alleviate PMS symptoms is not entirely understood, but it may be related to its role in the synthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, which are involved in regulating mood.

Dosage of vitamin B6 for premenstrual syndrome:

The recommended daily intake of vitamin B6 for adults is 1.3-1.5mg/day. Higher doses of vitamin B6 may cause nerve damage, so it’s important not to exceed the recommended daily dose.

Herbal supplement for Premenstural syndrome:

Herbal supplements have been used for centuries to alleviate symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Some of the most commonly used herbal supplements for PMS include:

  1. Chasteberry: Also known as Vitex, chasteberry is believed to help regulate the hormones responsible for PMS symptoms. It may help reduce breast tenderness, cramps, and mood swings.
  2. Ginger: Ginger has anti-inflammatory properties and may help alleviate cramps, bloating, and headaches.
  3. Evening primrose oil: Evening primrose oil is high in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an omega-6 fatty acid that may help reduce breast tenderness and cramps.
  4. Black cohosh: Black cohosh is believed to help regulate hormones and may help reduce breast tenderness and cramps.
  5. St. John’s wort: St. John’s wort is commonly used to treat mild to moderate depression. It may help with mood-related symptoms of PMS.
  6. Dong quai: Dong Quai is also known as “female ginseng,”. It is believed to help regulate hormones and may help reduce cramps and breast tenderness.

It’s important to note that the safety and effectiveness of these supplements have not been established, and the use of these supplements may have some risks and side effects. It’s also important to note that some of these supplements may interact with other medications.

So it’s important to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any supplement regimen. They will be able to evaluate your symptoms, and work with you to develop an appropriate treatment plan that may include supplements as well as other lifestyle changes such as exercise, healthy eating, and stress management.

Conclusion:

It is always best to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any treatment regimen. Your healthcare provider can help you evaluate your symptoms, and work with you to develop an appropriate treatment plan that may include lifestyle changes such as exercise, healthy eating, and stress management.

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Premenstural syndrome
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